Setting up Minikube on Thinkpad X220

Today, I was setting up Minikube on Thinkpad X220 running Ubuntu.

Enable and install KVM

  1. Boot systems to BIOS with the F1 key at power on.
  2. Select the Security tab in the BIOS.
  3. Enable Intel VTT and Intel VT-d.

Follow instructions from https://help.ubuntu.com/community/KVM/Installation.

Check that your CPU supports hardware virtualization. To run KVM, you need a processor that supports hardware virtualization. Intel and AMD both have developed extensions for their processors, deemed respectively Intel VT-x (code name Vanderpool) and AMD-V (code name Pacifica). To see if your processor supports one of these, you can review the output from this command:

$ egrep -c '(vmx|svm)' /proc/cpuinfo
8
$ kvm-ok 
INFO: /dev/kvm exists
KVM acceleration can be used

Install packages:

$ sudo apt-get install qemu-kvm libvirt-daemon-system libvirt-clients
bridge-utils

Add your user to kvm groups:

$ sudo adduser `id -un` libvirt
Adding user '<username>' to group 'libvirt' ...
$ sudo adduser `id -un` kvm
Adding user '<username>' to group 'kvm' ...

Verify Installation:

$ virsh list --all
 Id Name                 State
----------------------------------

$ virt-host-validate 
  QEMU: Checking for hardware virtualization                                 : PASS
  QEMU: Checking if device /dev/kvm exists                                   : PASS
  QEMU: Checking if device /dev/kvm is accessible                            : PASS
  QEMU: Checking if device /dev/vhost-net exists                             : PASS
  QEMU: Checking if device /dev/net/tun exists                               : PASS
  QEMU: Checking for cgroup 'cpu' controller support                         : PASS
  QEMU: Checking for cgroup 'cpuacct' controller support                     : PASS
  QEMU: Checking for cgroup 'cpuset' controller support                      : PASS
  QEMU: Checking for cgroup 'memory' controller support                      : PASS
  QEMU: Checking for cgroup 'devices' controller support                     : PASS
  QEMU: Checking for cgroup 'blkio' controller support                       : PASS
  QEMU: Checking for device assignment IOMMU support                         : PASS
  QEMU: Checking if IOMMU is enabled by kernel                               : WARN (IOMMU appears to be disabled in kernel. Add intel_iommu=on to kernel cmdline arguments)
  QEMU: Checking for secure guest support                                    : WARN (Unknown if this platform has Secure Guest support)
   LXC: Checking for Linux >= 2.6.26                                         : PASS
   LXC: Checking for namespace ipc                                           : PASS
   LXC: Checking for namespace mnt                                           : PASS
   LXC: Checking for namespace pid                                           : PASS
   LXC: Checking for namespace uts                                           : PASS
   LXC: Checking for namespace net                                           : PASS
   LXC: Checking for namespace user                                          : PASS
   LXC: Checking for cgroup 'cpu' controller support                         : PASS
   LXC: Checking for cgroup 'cpuacct' controller support                     : PASS
   LXC: Checking for cgroup 'cpuset' controller support                      : PASS
   LXC: Checking for cgroup 'memory' controller support                      : PASS
   LXC: Checking for cgroup 'devices' controller support                     : PASS
   LXC: Checking for cgroup 'freezer' controller support                     : PASS
   LXC: Checking for cgroup 'blkio' controller support                       : PASS
   LXC: Checking if device /sys/fs/fuse/connections exists                   : PASS

Restart the machine as logout and the kernel modules restart didn’t work for me.

Install Minikube

Follow instructions from https://minikube.sigs.k8s.io/docs/start/.

Download minikube binary:

$ curl -LO https://storage.googleapis.com/minikube/releases/latest/minikube-darwin-amd64
$ sudo install minikube-darwin-amd64 /usr/local/bin/minikube

Make KVM the default driver

$ minikube config set driver kvm2
❗  These changes will take effect upon a minikube delete and then a minikube start

Start minikube:

$ minikube start
😄  minikube v1.17.1 on Ubuntu 20.04
✨  Using the kvm2 driver based on existing profile
👍  Starting control plane node minikube in cluster minikube
💾  Downloading Kubernetes v1.20.2 preload ...
🏃  Updating the running kvm2 "minikube" VM ...
🐳  Preparing Kubernetes v1.20.2 on Docker 20.10.2 ...
    ▪ Generating certificates and keys ...
    ▪ Booting up control plane ...
    ▪ Configuring RBAC rules ...
🔎  Verifying Kubernetes components...
🌟  Enabled addons: default-storageclass, storage-provisioner
💡  kubectl not found. If you need it, try: 'minikube kubectl -- get pods -A'
🏄  Done! kubectl is now configured to use "minikube" cluster and "default" namespace by default

Install kubectl tool:

$ sudo snap install kubectl --classic

Now, we can check which pods are running inside the cluster:

$ kubectl get po -A
NAMESPACE     NAME                               READY   STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
kube-system   coredns-74ff55c5b-jzj8w            1/1     Running   0          2m40s
kube-system   etcd-minikube                      1/1     Running   0          2m49s
kube-system   kube-apiserver-minikube            1/1     Running   0          2m49s
kube-system   kube-controller-manager-minikube   1/1     Running   0          2m49s
kube-system   kube-proxy-xdlr2                   1/1     Running   0          2m40s
kube-system   kube-scheduler-minikube            1/1     Running   0          2m49s
kube-system   storage-provisioner                1/1     Running   0
2m55s

Later in the day, I was interviewed by Pius from the Recurse Center. We talked about my motivation for joining the program. Apparently, I’ve been talking too much about meta-stuff, but I’m glad that at the end Pius asked me about more practical stuff. I briefly explained what Diggy is and what could be the next reasonable goal.

A few hours later, I received an email telling me that I passed the first round and asking me to work on one of the pair programming tasks. I decided to build a simple Space Invaders game. For the rest of the day, I was thinking about architecture.

Space Invaders: the First Day →